Birth Atlas
About the Florida Birth Atlas     

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The Florida Birth Atlas provides a written analysis and graphic display of fertility trends in Florida over the past quarter century. There are several maps, charts and graphs, used to illustrate demographic trends from 1989 to 2016, by age, race, and ethnicity.
Unknown values of birth are not included in graphs. Due to this, the data displayed in each graphic is only for total known records.

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Maternal Age

In general, fertility rates and the proportion of births has been increasing in the older age groups. Since 1989, the highest fertility rates were for women ages 20 to 24 until 2002 when mothers 25 to 29 became the forerunner. Fertility rates for women 30 to 34 increased from 73.4 per 1,000 females in 1989 to 97.43 in 2017. In contrast, the fertility rates for women age 20 to 24 decreased from 122.4 per 1000 females in 1989 to 71.1 in 2017. This is also reflected in the proportion of births in these two age groups. In 1989, 27.2% of births were to mothers age 20 to 24 and this decreased to 19.7% in 2017. The proportion of births in the 30 to 34 age group increased from 19.7% in 1989 to 28% in 2017.

Fertility

In 1990, the fertility rate per 1,000 women age 15 to 44 was 70.7. This decreased to 62.8 in 2000 and 60.4 in 2010. In 2017 this rate was 59.2

Teen Births

The fertility rate in 1989 for teens age 15 to 19 was 68.0 births per 1,000 females age 15 to 19. This declined to a rate of 18.5 in 2017. The proportion of births to teens age 15 to 19 was 13.8% in 1989 and decreased to 4.8% in 2017.

Births by Residence of Mother

In 2017, there were 223,579 live births to Florida residents. Of these births 70.7% were to white mothers and 22.27% were to black mothers and the remaining 6.51% were to mothers of other races. There were 29.8% of births to Hispanic mothers and 4.1% to Haitians.


Note: Starting in 2004, "mothers education" is measured according to the highest degree received. Prior to 2004, "mother education" was measured according to the highest grade completed. Consequently, these data may not be comparable to that from prior years. Also beginning in 2004, the state total for the denominator in this calculation may be greater than the sum of county totals due to an unknown county of residence on some records.

Note: Starting in 2004, "mothers education" is measured according to the highest degree received. Prior to 2004, "mother education" was measured according to the highest grade completed. Consequently, these data may not be comparable to that from prior years. Also beginning in 2004, the state total for the denominator in this calculation may be greater than the sum of county totals due to an unknown county of residence on some records.

Note: The birth certificate was changed in 2004 to capture all of the races representing the mother’s heritage, rather than only reporting a single race for the mother.

Note: The birth certificate was changed in 2004 to capture all of the races representing the mother’s heritage, rather than only reporting a single race for the mother.