School-aged Child and Adolescent Profile - 2018

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School-aged Child and Adolescent Profile, Alachua County, Florida - 2018
IndicatorRate TypeYear(s)County Quartile 
1=most favorable
4=least favorable
County NumberCounty RateState Comparison
Socio-Demographic Characteristics
Count2018 263,753
20,957,705
Count2018 18,500
1,623,068
     White
Count2018 10,464
1,121,659
     Black
Count2018 5,644
363,914
     Hispanic
Count2018 1,963
510,531
     Non-Hispanic
Count2018 16,537
1,112,538
Count2018 21,836
1,672,118
     White
Count2018 13,661
1,179,904
     Black
Count2018 5,635
365,985
     Hispanic
Count2018 2,454
507,131
     Non-Hispanic
Count2018 19,382
1,164,987
Dollars2013-171st Quartile$45,478$50,883
Percent2013-171st Quartile18.9%18.2%
Percent2013-171st Quartile11297%1126772%
Percent2013-171st Quartile8,5816.6%7.2%
Percent2013-171st Quartile7.9%12.4%
Percent2013-171st Quartile8,7803.6%11.8%
Percent20181st Quartile8,32258.9%60.5%
Percent20181st Quartile3,43853.3%57.2%
Percent2012-161st Quartile5.9%8.9%
Per 100,00020171st Quartile91501.8413.7
Per 100,00020171st Quartile62428.3410.6
Per 100,0002015-171st Quartile6161,156.3932.8
Per 100,0002015-171st Quartile4890.159.8
Social-emotional Development
Percent20141st Quartile89.7%91.4%
Percent20181st Quartile54%56%
Percent20161st Quartile96.2%94.4%
Percent20161st Quartile94.9%93.6%
Percent20181st Quartile1550.5%0.5%
Percent20171st Quartile6.4%10.2%
Percent20171st Quartile5494%3.4%
Percent20171st Quartile1081.7%1.8%
Percent20181st Quartile92.4%90.9%
Per 100,0002015-171st Quartile60627,075.75,520.1
Per 1,0002015-171st Quartile502658.725.8
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile28714,935.23,454.6
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile109170.270.3
Per 100,0002016-183955.166.3
Per 100,0002016-185484.337.0
Per 100,0002016-182332.519.6
Immunizations and Vaccine Preventable and Other Communicable Diseases
Percent2016-181st Quartile7,37493%93.9%
Percent2016-181st Quartile6,76597.3%96.1%
Count2016-181st Quartile2
44
Count2016-181st Quartile0
30
Per 100,000 Population 5-212016-1831.63.9
Count2016-181st Quartile0
8
Count2016-181st Quartile0
4
Count2016-181st Quartile1
50
Per 100,000 Population 5-212016-1850.61.7
Per 100,000 Population 5-212016-181st Quartile63.26.6
Per 100,000 Females 15-212016-1832.73.4
Count2016-181st Quartile0
11
Per 100,000 Population < 102016-1878.56.6
Modifiable Risks and Behaviors2
Ratio20171st Quartile1,190.62,392.7
Percent20161st Quartile77.2%78.3%
Percent20181st Quartile14.1%13.2%
Percent20181st Quartile0.6%0.4%
Percent20161st Quartile9.3%8.3%
Percent20161st Quartile6.5%3.2%
Percent20161st Quartile4%3.2%
Percent20161st Quartile79.9%80.6%
Percent20181st Quartile13.5%14.3%
Percent20181st Quartile1.6%2.2%
Percent20161st Quartile27.6%25.5%
Percent20161st Quartile12.6%10.9%
Percent20161st Quartile20%17%
Per 1,0002016-181st Quartile36811.118.2
Per 1,0002016-181st Quartile726.77.4
Per 1,0002016-181st Quartile29613.334.6
Percent2016-181st Quartile4813%15.4%
Percent2016-181st Quartile34.2%7.2%
Percent2016-181st Quartile4515.2%18.1%
Per 100,0002016-18810.410.7
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile22123,529.42,581.4
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile13624,117.23,345.1
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile21353,321.94,092.9
Potentially Avoidable Hospitalizations6
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile441812.4398.5
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile494771.4440.0
Per 100,0002016-182138.744.7
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile101157.7140.6
Injuries
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile4739334,181.037,684.9
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile86216.0105.2
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile220222.6172.5
Per 1,00020171st Quartile72.649.7
Per 1,00020171st Quartile111.965.4
Per 100,0002015-171st Quartile459861.6484.1
Per 100,0002015-171st Quartile501793.6635.3
Per 100,0002016-181537.719.5
Per 100,0002016-181527.618.6
Per 100,0002016-18513.822.8
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile4367.161.2
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile6197.395.9
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile5983.3144.0
Per 100,0002016-181833.219.7
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile3148.448.3
Per 100,0002016-182839.580.9
Mortality
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile3122.427.1
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile717.612.8
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile513.814.6
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile1930.353.1
Per 100,0002016-1812.54.2
Per 100,0002016-1800.04.7
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile34.821.5
Per 100,0002016-1811.82.2
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile11.68.9
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile1014.127.3
Per 100,0002016-1800.00.7
Per 100,0002016-1834.75.3
Per 100,0002016-1834.214.9
Per 100,0002016-18812.55.8
Per 100,0002016-1834.212.7
Per 100,0002016-1800.01.9
Per 100,0002016-1800.03.4
Per 100,0002016-1800.014.3
Per 100,0002016-1800.01.6
Per 100,0002016-181st Quartile11.67.8
Per 100,0002016-1811.420.9

Data Note(s)

Population - Rates are calculated using July 1 population estimates from the Florida Legislature, Office of Economic and Demographic Research which have been allocated by race based on information from the US Bureau of the Census. The population data for 2011-2021, along with rates affected by the population data, was updated on FLHealthCHARTS in November 2017. It is customary to periodically revise population estimates based on new information, such as a census or new mid-course census estimates for prior years. Revising these estimates ensures accurate accounting of the racial, ethnic, and gender distribution of the population. These changes affect the population data and rates calculated for your community.

Year - Time periods include single calendar years (ex. 2015) and three-year counts (ex. 2013-15).

County Quartiles - Quartiles in this report allow you to compare health data from one county to another in the state. Quartiles are calculated by ordering a rate from most favorable to least favorable by county and dividing the list into 4 groups. In this report, a low quartile number (1) always represents more favorable health situations while fours (4) represent less favorable situations. Blanks in this column indicate that not enough data was available to calcuate a quartile or that a quartile calculation was not appropriate (i.e. population counts).

Counts - Counts for indicators displaying a 3-year rate are the count of events over 3 years. Blank spaces in this column indicate that no count is available for the indicator. A count of less than 2 indicates, less than 2 events per year over a 3 year period. A count of less than 1 indicates an count of less than 1 event per year over a 3 year period. Hospitalization counts are supressed if there are between 1-4 cases.

Rates - Rates are frequently used when numbers are too small to use percent (per 100). For example, Florida's birth rate of 4.8 per 1000 females over age 35 would be the same as saying that 0.48% of females over age 35 had babies. Rates are typically expressed per 1000, per 10,000 or per 100,000, depending on how rare an event is. Rates based on fewer than 5 events over a 3 year period are marked as unstable (U). When the rates are based on only a few cases or deaths, it is almost impossible to distinguish random fluctuation from true changes in the underlying risk of disease or injury. Therefore comparisons over time or between communities that are based on unstable rates can lead to erroneous conclusions about differences in risk which may or may not be valid. All age-adjusted rates utilize the Year 2000 Standard Population Proportion.

Blanks indicate that data is not available for the specified time period.

U = Unstable rate (based on fewer than 5 events). When the rates are based on only a few cases or deaths, it is almost impossible to distinguish random fluctuation from true changes in the underlying risk of disease or injury. Therefore comparisons over time or between communities that are based on unstable rates can lead to erroneous conclusions about differences in risk which may or may not be valid.

1Total population minus the sum total of white and black populations results in the other nonwhite population count. TOTAL - (WHITE+BLACK) = OTHER NONWHITE.

2Modifiable behaviors leading to premature death are the major external (nongenetic) factors that contribute to death in the US, first identified as "Actual Causes of Death" by McGinnis and Foege in 1993. These three sets of behaviors each contribute to approximately half of the deaths annually in addition to their impact on morbidity, quality of life, and public health burden.

3Counties with greater than 10 HIV cases ages 13-19 do not have counts or rates available.

4Includes sexual battery, battery, homicide and kidnapping.

5Florida's high school graduation rate is the percentage of students who graduated within four years of their initial enrollment in ninth grade, not counting deceased students or students who transferred out to attend another public school outside the system, a private school, a home education program, or an adult education program. Incoming transfer students are included in the appropriate cohort (the group whose progress is tracked) based on their grade level and year of entry.

6Potentially avoidable hospitalizations are those for which good outpatient care can potentially prevent complications or more severe disease.

7 n/a - For school districts with no nurses a nurse-student ratio cannot be calculated.