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FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH Division of Public Health Statistics & Performance Management

Quick Facts

Quick Facts are updated on FLHealthCHARTS each month. Those published relate to the national health observances highlighted in the Current Features on the home page.

August 2018

  • Mothers with a high school education or more had the highest rates of breastfeeding.
  • In Florida, 86% of new mothers initiated breastfeeding in 2017 compared with 84.0% in 2014.
  • Data from the National Immunization Survey show the percentage of Florida infants who met the national recommendation of being breastfed for six months increased from 15.6% in 2010 to 24.3% in 2014.
  • Data from the National Immunization Survey show the percentage of Florida infants who met the national recommendation of being breastfed for twelve months increased from 20.7% in 2010 to 27.9% in 2014.
  • August 1–7 is World Breastfeeding Week.
  • Miami-Dade County saw a 5.4% decline in diagnosed HIV cases from 2016 (1,263 cases) to 2017 (1,195 cases).
  • Broward County saw a 3.1% decline in diagnosed HIV cases from 2016 (738 cases) to 2017 (715 cases).

July 2018

  • In 2017, there were 451 deaths due to viral hepatitis.
  • In 2016, 122 cases of hepatitis A were reported in Florida. All could have been prevented with the vaccine.
  • In 2016, 709 cases of acute hepatitis B were reported in Florida, up from 519 in 2015. All could have been prevented with the vaccine.
  • In 2016, 4,972 cases of chronic hepatitis B were newly reported in Florida, up from 4,827 in 2015.
  • In 2016, 447 cases of hepatitis B in pregnant women were reported in Florida, down from 476 in 2015.
  • In 2016, 301 cases of acute hepatitis C were reported in Florida, up from 210 in 2015.
  • Hepatitis causes inflammation of the liver and can result in chronic liver disease, liver cirrhosis and liver cancer.
  • In 2017, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis was Florida’s 10th leading cause of death, accounting for 3,080 deaths.
  • In 2017, the age-adjusted death rate from chronic liver disease and cirrhosis was 11.4 per 100,000.
  • With treatment, most children with orofacial clefts do well and lead a healthy life.
  • The Florida Birth Defects Profile provides data about rates of birth defects in Florida.
  • About 280 infants are born each year in Florida with orofacial clefts (cleft lip, cleft palate or both).
  • In 2017, unintentional drowning rates were 2.0 per 100,000 for all ages, but they were 6.0 per 100,000 for 0–4-year-olds.

June 2018

  • In 2016, 81.4% of men and 79.7% of women said their health was good or excellent.
  • In 2016, 66.5% of men and 77.1% of women reported they had a personal doctor.
  • In 2016, the top three leading causes of death for men were heart diseases, cancer and unintentional injury.
  • In 2016, men had an age-adjusted unintentional injury death rate of 77.5 per 100,000, while the rate for women was 34.8 per 100,000.
  • In 2017, 69.7% of men and 56.7% of women were overweight or obese.
  • In 2016, 27.1% of men in Florida reported that they were sedentary compared with 32.3% of women.
  • In 2016, 21.7% of men reported they engaged in heavy or binge drinking compared with 13.7% of women.
  • Males with an MSM exposure were more likely than any other persons living with HIV to be co-infected with HIV and syphilis in 2016.
  • Fifty percent of Caribbean-born adults diagnosed with HIV in 2016 were Hispanic males.

May 2018

  • In 2016, 6.7% of adults in Florida reported having asthma. While 8.2% of women reported having asthma, only 5.2% of men did.
  • In 2016, 44.8% of Florida’s adults reported that they meet aerobic activity recommendations of 150 minutes or more per week (men: 48%, women: 41.9%).
  • In 2016, 80.6% of high school students were without sufficient vigorous physical activity, up from 40.7% in 2006.
  • In 2016, 78.3% of middle school students were without sufficient vigorous physical activity, up from 30.9% in 2006.
  • Teen birth rates in Florida have decreased substantially in the last two decades. Birth rates among all race/ethnic groups decreased from 57.5 (1996) to 19.5 per 1,000 females ages 15–19.
  • Older adults (50 or older) accounted for 58,200 (51%) of people living with HIV disease in 2016.
  • The number of new HIV cases diagnosed among Asians and Pacific Islanders has increased by 39% over the past ten years, from 44 in 2007 to 61 in 2016—more than any other race/ethnic group.
  • Only 15.5% of adult Floridians were current smokers in 2016, down from 22.2% in 2002.
  • From 2002 to 2016, tobacco use among high school students (smoking within the last 30 days) decreased from 17.8% to 5.2%.

April 2018

  • 17% of people diagnosed with HIV in 2016 were young people (ages 13 to 24).
  • In 2016, blacks represented 15% of Florida’s adult (age 13+) population yet represented 50% of the diagnosed HIV cases.
  • The 2014–16 AIDS case rate was nearly 8 times higher among black than white persons (35.7 versus 4.5 per 100,000 population).
  • Rates for fetal death, maternal death and infant death for 2014–16 were all more than two times higher among blacks than whites.
  • In 2017, approximately 85% of Florida’s 2-year-olds were up-to-date with recommended vaccinations.
  • Rates of chlamydia and infectious syphilis have increased annually since 2010.
  • Although the overall age-adjusted death rate is higher among black than white persons, the gap is closing.
  • The rates of motor vehicle crashes and deaths in Florida have increased every year since 2012.
  • Motor vehicle crashes in Florida increased to 395,521 in 2016. This trend began in 2012 with 281,549 motor vehicle crashes.
  • Deaths from motor vehicle crashes in Florida increased to 3,226 in 2016. This is a death rate of 16.0 per 100,000 population.
  • In 2016, there was an average of 8.2 deaths per 1,000 motor vehicle crashes in Florida.
  • The death rate per 100,000 population for motor vehicle crashes in Florida was 9.8 for females and 24.1 for males in 2016.
  • Males 20–24 years old had the highest adult death rate for motor vehicle crashes at 47.6 per 100,000 population.
  • Females age 55–64 had the lowest adult death rate for motor vehicle crashes in Florida at 7.9 per 100,000 population.

March 2018

  • Florida’s adjusted death rate for colorectal cancer decreased 46.2% from 25.1 to 13.5 per 100,000 population from 1981 to 2014.
  • Take action to get regular colorectal cancer screening beginning at age 50. After age 75, talk to your healthcare provider to decide whether to get screened.
  • The risk of developing colorectal cancer increases with age and is greater among men than in women.
  • For 2014–2016, the death rate from colorectal cancer among Hispanics was .9 times that of non-Hispanics.
  • For 2014–2016, the death rate from colorectal cancer among blacks was 1.3 times that of whites.
  • In 2016, HIV was the 6th leading cause of death among women and the 8th leading cause of death among men for those ages 25–44.
  • Survival time from AIDS diagnosis to death is significantly shorter for females than males.
  • The greatest proportion of women (28%) diagnosed with HIV in 2016 were ages 50 and older.
  • In Florida, the majority (65%) of American Indians living with HIV in Florida through 2016 were diagnosed with HIV between the ages of 20 and 39.

February 2018

  • Florida Healthy Babies is a statewide initiative to positively influence social determinants and reduce racial disparity in infant mortality.
  • The Department’s Health Equity Program Council focuses on helping all Floridians achieve the highest level of health.
  • 19.2% of adults in Florida could not see a dentist in the past year because of cost.
  • 47.3% of adult Floridians have had a permanent tooth removed because of tooth decay or gum loss.
  • In 2015, 77% of Florida’s population received optimally fluoridated water through community water systems, contributing to better oral health.
  • Cancer and heart disease have been the top two leading causes of death in Florida for decades, accounting for 45.6% of all deaths in 2016.
  • Among cancer deaths, lung cancer is the most common, accounting for 25.3% of cancer deaths in 2016.
  • In 2016, Florida’s age-adjusted death rate for heart disease was 150.7 per 100,000, down from 253.1 in 1997.
  • In 2016, deaths from stroke were disproportionately greater for blacks than whites with a risk ratio of 1.5:1.
  • In 2016, deaths from prostate and cervical cancer were disproportionately greater for blacks than whites with risk ratios of 2.3:1 and 1.4:1, respectively.
  • 51 County Health Departments provide school-based preventive dental programs.
  • Every $1 invested in dental sealants applied by County Health Department dental programs yields $1.88 in dental treatment savings.
  • Oral screening projects have been conducted with Florida’s third grade and Early Head Start/Head Start populations.

January 2018

  • Cardiovascular conditions are the most common kinds of birth defects.
  • The age-adjusted lung cancer death rate decreased from 59.4 per 100,000 deaths in 1997 to 37.6 in 2016.
  • In 2016, 15.5% of adults reported they were current smokers.
  • In 2016, 62.1% of Florida’s smokers had tried to quit smoking in the past year.
  • Fewer mothers are smoking during pregnancy: 11.4% in 1997 and 5.1% in 2016.
  • In 2016, 58.0% of Florida adults reported they never smoked, up from 56.2% in 2015.
  • The age-adjusted cervical cancer death rate decreased from 3.4 per 100,000 in 1997 to 2.6 in 2016.
  • In 2016, 80.5% of adults said their overall health was “good” to “excellent.”
  • Reduce your risk of cervical cancer by not smoking.
  • The American Cancer Society reports that smoking doubles your risk for cervical cancer.
  • Increase your chance of having a healthy baby by preventing infections before and during pregnancy. #Prevent2Protect
  • The rate of infant deaths due to preterm and low birthweight causes has declined 25% between 2010 and 2016 from 1.2 to .9 per 1,000 live births.
  • Florida’s poverty rate has declined from 16.5% in 2011-2015 to 16.1% in 2012-2016.

December 2017

  • In 2016 there were 2,807 deaths from influenza and pneumonia.
  • Florida’s age-adjusted death rate from influenza and pneumonia increased from 8.7 per 100,000 population in 2007 to 9.6 in 2016.
  • Pregnant women, older people and young children are at greater risk for serious complications from flu.
  • Getting vaccinated each year is the best way to prevent the flu from infecting people.
  • The proportion of adults ages 65+ that received a flu shot in the past year has been declining: from 77.8% in 2008 to 51.4% in 2015.
  • In 2016, the Florida Department of Health estimated that of the approximate 20 million people residing in Florida, 135,986 individuals are living with HIV.
  • Florida ranked first in the nation for the number of new HIV cases in 2015, (4,864 or 12% of the U.S. total for new infections), and second in new HIV case rates (24.0 cases per 100,000 population).

November 2017

  • In 2016, there were over 19,000 tobacco-related cancer deaths in Florida.
  • According to the American Lung Association, smoking accounts for 30% of all cancer deaths and 87% of lung cancer deaths.
  • According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, “32% of all deaths from coronary heart disease were attributable to smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke.”
  • In 2015, an estimated 15.8% of adults in Florida were current smokers, based on data from the Florida Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS).
  • The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual screening for lung cancer in adults aged 55–80 years with a 30 pack-year smoking history and currently smoke or have quit in the past 15 years.
  • The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force began recommending screening for lung cancer in 2014. Read full text of recommendations.

October 2017

  • In 2014 there were 54,138 new female cancer cases in Florida; 15,570 (29%) of these were breast cancer cases.
  • In the years 2005 through 2014 age-adjusted breast cancer rates increased from 110.1 to 119.0 per 100,00 females.
  • Age-adjusted breast cancer death rates decreased from 22.2 per 100,000 females in 2005 to 20.1 in 2014.
  • The percentage of breast cancer cases diagnosed at late stage was 33.3% in 2014 and 33.4% in 2005.
  • In 2015, 51.4% of Floridians age 65 and older received the flu shot in the past year.
  • In 2016, the age-adjusted death rate for influenza and pneumonia was 9.8 per 100,000 Floridians.

September 2017

  • In 2015, 13.1% of individuals in Florida 25 years old and over did not have a high school diploma.
  • The age-adjusted death rate due to unintentional falls was 10.3 per 100,000 people in Florida.
  • 28.2% of middle and high school students in Florida are overweight or obese.
  • In 2015, 3.6% of Floridians age 18–64 had difficulty living independently.
  • From 2006 to 2015, the percent of WIC children age two or older who were overweight or obese has declined from 30.2% to 26.4%.

August 2017

  • In Florida, 86% of all babies born in 2016 were breastfed initially.
  • Hispanic mothers were more likely than white, black or non-Hispanic mothers to breastfed their babies in 2016 (90.4%).
  • Mothers with a high school education or more had the highest rates of breastfeeding.
  • The National Immunization Survey reports that the percentage of Florida mothers who exclusively breastfed their babies for three months increased from 27.8% in 2007 to 44.9% in 2016.
  • The National Immunization Survey reports that the percentage of Florida mothers who breastfed their babies for six months increased from 37.5% in 2007 to 47.3% in 2016.
  • August 1-7 is World Breastfeeding Week

July 2017

  • In 2014 and in 2015, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis was the 10th leading cause of death in Florida.
  • In 2015, the age adjusted death rate from chronic liver disease and cirrhosis was 12.0 per 100,000. White males: 17.2, black males: 8.2, white females: 9.6 and black females: 4.3.
  • With treatment, most children with orofacial clefts do well and lead a healthy life.
  • The Florida Birth Defects Profile provides data about rates of birth defects in Florida.
  • About 280 infants are born each year in Florida with orofacial clefts
  • In 2015, drowning rates were 2.1 per 100,000 for all ages, but they were 6.1 per 100,000 for 0-4 year olds.
  • In 2015, 21.9% of men reported they engaged in heavy or binge drinking compared with 13.4% of women.

June 2017

  • In 2015, 82.4% of men and 80.8% of women said their health was good or excellent.
  • In 2015, 73.5% of men and 82.0% of women reported they had a personal doctor.
  • In 2015, the top three leading causes of death for men were heart diseases, cancer and unintentional injury.
  • Men’s age adjusted homicide by firearms death rate at 8.2 per 100,000 was more than six times that of women at 1.3 per 100,000 in 2015
  • In 2015, 70.1% of men and 57.9% of women were overweight or obese.
  • About one in four men (25.4%) in Florida reported that they were sedentary in 2015.
  • In 2015, 21.9% of men reported they engaged in heavy or binge drinking compared with 13.4% of women.
  • Of the adults living with HIV in Florida through 2015, 16% were Caribbean-born.
  • In 2015, 79% of the adult HIV infection cases were male, compared to 71% in 2006.
  • The relative increase in male HIV cases in recent years might be attributed to increases in HIV transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM).

May 2017

  • In 2015, 7.4 % of adults in Florida reported having asthma. While 9.5% of women reported having asthma, only 5.3% of men did.
  • The age-adjusted asthma hospitalization rate has increased every year from 1998 to 2014 – from a rate of 420.9 to 823.4 per 100,000 people.
  • In 2014, there were 3,061 asthma hospitalizations among children under age 5. Rates have declined from a high of 616.5 in 2003 to the 2014 rate of 277.4 per 100,000.
  • In 2015, 51.6% of Florida’s adults reported that they meet aerobic activity recommendations of 150 minutes or more per week. (men: 52.1%, women: 51.2%).
  • In 2013, only 32.2% of middle school students participated in 60 minutes of daily physical activity.
  • Males at 40.7% were significantly more likely than females at 23.4% to achieve the recommended amount of physical activity.
  • Teen birth rates in Florida have decreased substantially in the last two decades. For those ages 15-19, birth rates decreased from 57.5 in 1996 to 20.3 per 1,000 females ages 15-19.
  • Older adults (50 or older) accounted for 54,514 (49%) of people living with HIV disease in 2015.
  • The number of new HIV diagnoses among Asians and Pacific Islanders has increased by 47% over the past ten years, from 47 in 2006 to 69 in 2015.
  • Of the AIDS cases that died in Florida from 2010-2015, Asians had a median survival of only 20 months. This compares to 109 months for whites, 83 months for Hispanics, 82 months for blacks and 79 months for American Indians.
  • Only 15.8% of adult Floridians were current smokers in 2015, down from 22.2% in 2002.
  • From 2001 to 2015, tobacco use among youth ages 11-17 decreased from 7% to 3.9%, and cigar use decreased from 8.4% to 5%.
  • E-Vaping among youth ages 11-17 increased from 2% to 10.9% from 2001 to 2015.

April 2017

  • The 2013-15 AIDS case rate is more than seven times higher among black than white persons (42.5 versus 5.5 per 100,000 population).
  • The fetal death rate, maternal death rate and infant death rate are all more than two times higher among blacks than whites
  • In 2015, approximately 85.5% of Florida’s 2- year-olds were up to date with recommended vaccinations.
  • In 2015 chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis all increased nationally and in Florida.
  • Although the overall age adjusted death rate is higher among black than white persons, the gap is closing.

March 2017

  • Florida’s age adjusted colorectal cancer rate declined from 1981 to 2013 from 59.7 to 34.4 per 100,000 population, a 42.4% decrease.
  • Florida’s adjusted death rate for colorectal cancer decreased 44.6% from 25.1 to 13.9 per 100,000 population from 1981 to 2013.
  • Take action to get regular colorectal cancer screening beginning at age 50. After age 75, talk to your healthcare provider to decide whether or not to get screened.
  • The risk of developing colorectal cancer increases with age and is greater among men than in women.
  • The death rate from colorectal cancer is lower among Hispanics than non-Hispanics.
  • The death rate from colorectal cancer is higher among blacks than whites.
  • In 2015, HIV was the 5th leading cause of death among women ages 25-44.
  • Survival time from AIDS diagnosis to death is significantly shorter for females than males.
  • Among women, those 50 years of age and older represent the age group with the highest percent of HIV infection cases diagnosed in 2015, accounting for 29% of HIV female infection cases.
  • In Florida, the majority (68%) of American Indians diagnosed with HIV infection through 2015 were between the ages of 20 and 39.

February 2017

  • In Florida, among the 50 rankable causes of death, the two largest categories are heart disease and cancer.
  • Since 2013, HIV dropped from 1st to the 5th leading cause of death among blacks ages 25-44.
  • In 2015, Florida’s age adjusted death rate for heart disease was 152.9 per 100,000, down from 260.0 in 1996.
  • Hospitalizations for congestive heart failure and stroke are disproportionately greater for blacks than whites.
  • In 2015, 77% of Florida’s population received fluoridated water through community water systems, contributing to better oral health.
  • Every $1 invested in community water fluoridation yields approximately $38 savings in dental treatment costs.
  • 51 County Health Departments provide school-based preventive dental programs.
  • Oral screening projects have been conducted with Florida’s Third Grade and Early Head Start/Head Start populations.
  • Every $1 invested in dental sealants applied by County Health Department dental programs yields $1.88 in dental treatment savings

January 2017

  • Defects of the heart are the most common kind of birth defect and cause most of the hospitalizations.
  • Although not all birth defects can be prevented, steps can be taken to increase a woman’s chance of having a healthy baby.
  • Since 1996, the age adjusted lung cancer death rate decreased from 59.4 per 100,000 deaths to 41.2 in 2015.
  • In 2015, 15.8% of adults reported they were current smokers.
  • In 2015, 64.9% of Florida’s smokers had tried to quit smoking in the past year.
  • Since 1996, mothers who smoked during pregnancy decreased from 12.2% to 5.8% in 2015.
  • In 2015, 56.2% of Florida’s adults reported they never smoked, up from 50.8% in 2002.
  • Since 1996, the age adjusted cervical cancer death rate decreased from 3.5 per 100,000 to 2.3 in 2015.
  • In 2015, 81.6% adults said their overall health was "good" to "excellent".
  • Reduce your risk of cervical cancer by not smoking.
  • According to the American Cancer Society, smoking doubles your risk for cervical cancer.
  • Women can increase their chances of having a healthy baby by preventing infections before and during pregnancy. #Prevent2Protect

December 2016

  • In 2015 there were 2,666 deaths from influenza and pneumonia.
  • Since 1995, Florida’s age-adjusted death rate from influenza and pneumonia decreased from 21.0 to 9.1 per 100,000 population in 2015.
  • The proportion of adults ages 65+ that received a flu shot in the past year has been declining: from 77.8% in 2008 to 51.4% in 2015.

November 2016

  • According to the American Lung Association, Smoking accounts for 30 percent of all cancer deaths and 87 percent of lung cancer deaths.
  • According to the Department of Health and Human Services, “32% of deaths from coronary heart disease were attributable to smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke.”
  • In 2015 an estimated 15.8% of adults in Florida were current smokers, based on data from the Florida Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS).

October 2016

  • Heart Disease, Cancer, Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease, Stroke and Unintentional Injury were the 5 leading causes of death in 2015.
  • The 5 leading causes of death in 2015 accounted for 122,517 deaths or 63% of the total Florida resident deaths.
  • The Heart disease age adjusted death rate decreased from 158.3 deaths per 100,000 population in 2010 to 152.9 in 2015, a 3.4% decrease.
  • The Cancer age adjusted death rate decreased from 161.2 per 100,000 population in 2010 to 154.3 in 2015, a 4.3% decrease.
  • The Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease age adjusted death rate was the same for 2010 and 2015 at 39.3 deaths per 100,000 population.
  • The Cerebrovascular Diseases age adjusted death rate increased from 32.0 per 100,000 population in 2010 to 38.0 in 2015, an increase of 18.8%.
  • The Unintentional Injury age adjusted death rate increased from 41.8 per 100,000 population in 2010 to 46.2 in 2015, an increase of 10.5%.

September 2016

  • Each year, through newborn screening 450 babies are diagnosed with disorders and 300 babies are diagnosed with hearing loss.
  • 35% of adults in Florida are not at a healthy weight
  • 1 out of 3 children are considered overweight or obese
  • From 2005 to 2014, the percent of WIC children age two or older who were overweight or obese has declined from 31.0% to 26.7%.
  • The costs of care for chronic disease from obesity alone are estimated to be $34 billion over the next 17 years.

August 2016

  • In 2015 persons age 65 and over comprised 19.1% of Florida’s population and 14.9% of the U.S. population.
  • In Florida the percentage of the population age 65 and over is projected to increase to 21.0% by 2020 and 25.5% in 2040.
  • Florida’s total population was estimated at 19,860,805 in 2015 and is projected to increase by 7.6% to 21,366,667 in 2020.
  • In comparison, Florida’s population age 65 and over was estimated at 3,785,857 in 2015 and is projected to increase by 17.9% to 4,465,169 in 2020.

July 2016

  • In 2014, 183 cases of acute Hepatitis C were reported in Florida.
  • In 2014, 107 cases of Hepatitis A were reported in Florida.
  • In 2014, 408 cases of acute Hepatitis B were reported in Florida.
  • In 2014, 510 cases of Hepatitis in pregnant women were reported in Florida.
  • In 2014, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis was the 10th leading cause of death in Florida.
  • In 2014, the age adjusted death rate from chronic liver disease and cirrhosis was 12.0 per 100,000.
  • In 2014, White males had the highest rate of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis at 18.2 per 100,000.
  • With treatment, most children with orofacial clefts do well and lead a healthy life.
  • Birth defects data and rates are found on the Florida Birth Defects Profile.
  • About 230 infants are born each year in Florida with orofacial clefts (cleft lip, cleft palate, or both).

June 2016

  • In 2014, the top three leading causes of death for men were heart diseases, cancer and unintentional injury.
  • In 2014, 82.4% of men and 79.2% of women said their health was good or excellent.
  • In 2014, 21.1% of men reported they engaged in heavy or binge drinking compared with 13.3% of women.
  • About one in five men (20.6%) in Florida reported that they were sedentary in 2014 compared to about one in four women (26.6%).
  • In 2014, 68.4% of men and 56.1% of women were overweight or obese. (Florida BRFSS)
  • In 2014, of the adults in Florida living with HIV disease, 15% were Caribbean-born.
  • Men’s age adjusted homicide death rate at 9.9 per 100,000 was more than three times that of women at 2.5 per 100,000
  • From 2002-2014, men’s age adjusted death rates from HIV/AIDS have decreased from 10.4 to 4.2 per 100,000.

May 2016

  • In 2014, 1 out of 12 (8 %) Florida adults had current asthma. While 10.6% of women reported having asthma, only 5.3% of men did.
  • In 2014, there were 8,732 asthma hospitalizations among children 1-5 in Florida, a rate of 784.40 per 100,000.
  • In 2014, 23.7% of Florida adults reported that they did not participate in leisure-time physical activity (men: 20.6%, women: 26.6%).
  • In 2013, about half (50.2%) of adults in Florida got the recommended amount of weekly aerobic activity (150 minutes or more).
  • In 2013, 43.9% of middle and high school students participated in 60 minutes of daily physical activity.
  • In Florida, the majority (63%) of Asians diagnosed with HIV infection through 2014 were between the ages of 20 and 39.
  • Of persons with AIDS who died in Florida from 2007-2014, Asians had a median survival of only 26 months compared to 90 months for whites.

April 2016

  • At least 23% of the estimated HIV Infection cases diagnosed in the United States in 2014 were under the age of 25.
  • In Florida 19% of all new HIV infections diagnosed in 2014 were among persons under the age of 25.
  • In 2015, approximately 85.5% of Florida’s 2- year-olds were up to date with recommended vaccinations

March 2016

  • It is estimated that 9,710 Florida men and women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer. 3,500 will die due to colorectal cancer in 2016.
  • Get regular colorectal cancer screening beginning at age 50. After age 75, talk to your healthcare provider to decide whether or not to get screened.
  • The risk of developing colorectal cancer increases with age and is greater among men than in women.
  • The death rate from colorectal cancer is lower among Hispanics than non-Hispanics.
  • The death rate from colorectal cancer is higher among blacks than whites.
  • In 2014, HIV was the 5th leading cause of death among women ages 25-44.
  • Survival time from AIDS diagnosis to death is significantly shorter for females than males.
  • In Florida, the majority (66%) of American Indians diagnosed with HIV infection through 2014 were between the ages of 20 and 39.

February 2016

  • In 2014, Florida’s age adjusted death rate for coronary heart disease was 99.3, down from 215.0 per 100,000 in 1995.
  • Hospitalizations for congestive heart failure, stroke and coronary heart disease are disproportionately greater for blacks than whites.
  • In 2013, 81.3% of Florida’s population used fluoridated water through community water systems.

January 2016

  • Birth defects are one of the leading causes of death in children less than one year of age - causing one in every five deaths.
  • Defects of the heart are the most common kind of birth defect and cause most of the hospitalizations.
  • Although not all birth defects can be prevented, steps can be taken to increase a woman’s chance of having a healthy baby.
  • Since 1995, the age adjusted lung cancer death rate decreased from 60.6 per 100,000 deaths to 41.7 in 2014.
  • In In 2013, 61.1% of Florida’s smokers had tried to quit smoking in the past year.
  • Since 1995, mothers who smoked during pregnancy decreased from 12.9% to 6.4% in 2014.
  • In 2013 55% of Florida’s adults reported they never smoked, up from 50.8% in 2002.
  • Since 1995, the age adjusted cervical cancer death rate decreased from 3.1 per 100,000 to 2.8 in 2014.
  • In 2013, 80.1% of Florida women age 21-65 had had a Pap test in the past 3 years.
  • Reduce your risk of cervical cancer by not smoking.
  • The HPV vaccine helps prevent cervical cancer.

December 2015

  • Since 1995, Florida’s HIV-Related Resident death rate has decreased from 30.1 to 4.8 per 100,000 population in 2014.
  • Men who have sex with men (MSM) of all races and ethnicities remain the population most profoundly affected by HIV.
  • Since 1995, Florida’s age-adjusted death rate from influenza and pneumonia has decreased from 21.0 to 9.7 per 100,000 population in 2014.
  • In 2013, 30.7% of adults in Florida had received a flu shot in the past year, and only 44.6% of those in higher risk groups had been vaccinated.

November 2015

  • In 2013, 11.2% of the adult Florida population reported having diabetes.
  • Overall, black Floridians are more likely to have a diabetes diagnosis, be hospitalized for diabetes complications and die from diabetes.
  • In 2014, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in Florida.
  • Over 700 Floridians die from lung cancer each year.
  • More than 16% of adult Floridians smoke.
  • Sixty one percent of smokers have tried to quit.
  • Estimates are that between 15% and 40% of the population will develop illness from influenza every year.
  • 1 in 5 Florida residences tested has elevated radon levels.
  • Melanoma is the second most common form of cancer for adolescents and young adults.

October 2015

  • The influenza and pneumonia age-adjusted death rate was 9.8 per 100,000 population in 2014.
  • In 2013, 66.2% of Floridians age 65 and older had ever received a pneumonia vaccine and 54.6% of Floridians had received a flu vaccine in the past year.
  • Florida’s breast cancer age-adjusted death rate was 20.1 per 100,000 population in 2014.
  • In 2014, deaths from breast cancer ranked fourth among deaths from cancer.
  • In 2014, Florida’s overall age-adjusted mortality rate for breast cancer was 20.1 per 100,000 population.
  • In 2014, the breast cancer age-adjusted death rates per 100,000 by race were Black women at 25.0, White women at 19.3 and Hispanic women at 17.1.

September 2015

  • Each year, through newborn screening 450 babies are diagnosed with disorders and 300 babies are diagnosed with hearing loss.
  • 35% of adults in Florida are not at a healthy weight
  • 1 out of 3 children are considered overweight or obese
  • From 2005 to 2014, the percent of WIC children age two or older who were overweight or obese has declined from 31.0% to 26.7%.
  • The costs of care for chronic disease from obesity alone are estimated to be $34 billion over the next 17 years.

August 2015

  • In Florida, 84.2% of all babies born in 2014 were breastfed initially.
  • Hispanic mothers were the most likely to breastfed their babies in 2014 (89.9%).
  • Mothers with a college degree had a higher rate of breastfeeding than those without a college degree.